Diver Day at the Aquarium of the Pacific – Saturday, March 10

Scientific divers, bug hunters, and warm-water warriors one-and-all, it’s time for Diver Day at Aquarium of the Pacific. Free admission to all certified divers with an urge to explore the underwater world without all the hassle of getting wet. Sponsored by the good people at Sherwood Scuba, this event will also showcase the great underwater work that volunteer divers are doing here in California and offer you the opportunity to get involved and help make a difference in the health of the ocean.

The title sponsor of the event Sherwood Scuba, has started a new initiative called Sherwood Scuba Marine Conservation which supports research and conservation-driven programs across the worlds oceans. Check out their Facebook page and like it to support some really terrific work and to find out how a dive manufacturer can make a difference in protecting the worlds oceans.

Mark your calendar for what will be “fin-tastic” day. See you out there.

For more information, click on the link below:




Happy World Oceans Day 2017! Our Oceans, Our Future.

In a time when the future of the worlds oceans is more unsure than at any point in history, we have this day to think about what it really means to have healthy oceans and what it takes to keep them that way. So while we raise a glass or munch some celebratory seaweed, remember that the only way to ensure healthy oceans for our future generations is to stay aware and in turn help raise awareness. The ocean you save may be your own.

Here are some ways you can celebrate and help protect our oceans at the same time at all these great events happening in California today.

Click on the dark brooding Garibaldi to visit the hope page of World Ocean Day

Rigs back to Reefs? Sacramento offers up a reprieve.

I’ve been writing quite a bit lately here and on other sites about the amazing marine life supported by the rapidly aging and soon-to-be-decommissioned oil rigs operating in the waters  here in the Southern California Bight. The problem facing the continued survival of these micro environments lies in the fact that there are quite a few marine conservation groups, supported by local communities, pushing for complete removal of the structures and the flourishing ecosystems they support. It’s a really odd confrontation between groups that usually find themselves on the same side of marine issues. On one side you have respected local scientists including Chris Lowe of CSULB and Dan Pondella of Occidental College conducting studies showing the productive and valuable nature of these ecosystems and presenting data that supports maintaining the rigs after their service lives have ended. Then on the other side, they are being challenged by prominent conservation groups such as the Ocean Foundation and the Sierra Club, who are  pushing for a complete restoration and removal of the rigs to an original state and holding the oil companies to the agreement they made to remove them entirely. It’s a really unique situation that has supporters of converting the rigs to reefs scrambling.

Platform Holly in the Santa Barbara Channel bait fish almost blotting out the Sun. Photo copyright by Bob Evans.

They have received some recent help. California Sen. Robert Hertzberg, D-Van Nuys, is proposing a bill that would create a process by which decommissioned rigs would be turned over to the State Lands Commission, with financial support, to maintain these rigs safely as reefs in perpetuity.

Take a few minutes to read this piece by Rachel Uranga of the Daily Breeze as she takes a in-depth look at the battle of these unique and flourishing ecosystems just off our shores and in the halls of Sacramento.

Also take a few minutes and watch this video by Emily Callahan and Amber Jackson from Rigs To Reefs and experience what these sides are fighting over.



Today is the first World Tuna Day, celebrating one of our most important fish. With over 80 countries worldwide having tuna fishing fleets, these “lions of the ocean” supply food security and nutrition, economic development, employment, government revenue, livelihoods, culture and recreation to millions of people across the globe.

All is not rosy for tuna though. There are major declines in tuna stock which threaten many different stakeholders, not the least of which is the tuna themselves.

Some groups are asking that you celebrate by not eating tuna today but I think your time could be better spent reading this letter from the Pew Foundation which gives a frank assessment of the the challenges tuna face moving forward and some successes that scientist and fishery managers are having as they look to protect them.

A lot to  think about but I think Tuna are worth it. See you out there.

San Diego’s Tuna Town is moving forward while looking back

Three-pole fishing for albacore

For over 40 years, starting in the 1920’s, San Diego was the Tuna capital of the the world. With a massive fleet of fishing boats and a complex of processing plants supplying tuna to a hungry world, the fishery was the third-largest employer in San Diego to only the US Navy and the aerospace industry. It was truly a way of life for mid-century San Diegans. The good times didn’t last however. With the end of WWII, major corporations started buying out the local processors and alienating the independent fishermen. Japanese imports further eroded the market and concerns over dolphins made the move to offshore fishing cheaper, driving the final nail in the coffin for what was once the late, great Tuna Town. by 1984 it was all but over.

Today, there isn’t much left of Tuna Town. Bumblebee Tuna has it’s corporate HQ there and a sustainable pole-and-line fishery has emerged but most of what the industry was is gone. But not forgotten. Catalina Offshore Products, a 40 year veteran of seafood supply in San Diego, just announced the launch of a line of sustainably U.S. caught “choice” canned tuna line. With a “catch to can” concept, the line promises to deliver a safer and better managed product for the fishery. It also brings a little reminder of what tuna fishing was like in San Diego when big, fast fish ran the town.

Enjoy the video below from the golden age of tuna fishing in California.


Diver Day at the Aquarium of the Pacific – March 11th

aquarium-of-the-pacificIt’s been such a wet winter in California that we haven’t had much time to get in the water  with our finned friends. The Aquarium of the Pacific wants to help you with your marine withdrawals and is offering free admission to certified divers showing their c-cards and accompanying I.D. There will also be exhibitions by a lot of great local marine scientists and NGO’s talking about the state of California’s ocean and how you can help. It’s a great time to get out with  the ocean community and enjoy a dry day with the fishes.


For more information, head over to the Diver Day page.

Yes, We’ve still got Ocean Problems in California – Throw Back Thursday

cfdaltlogoIn a world that seems to be more filled with uncertainty than ever these days, we at California Fine Diving would like to give a little perspective on where we in California are in terms of ocean health. This photo, provided by the Mendocino Historical Society, shows a couple of dapper turn-of-the-20th-century fishermen with what I think we can all agree is a pretty good days effort. From a cursory look, we can probably also agree what they lack in modern fishing technology, they more than make up for with ties and bowler hats. Looking good and fishing good.

photo provided courtesy of the Mendocino Historical Society

Now I’m not posting this just because it’s a great shot( it is wicked cool though). I’m posting it because It gives us a sense of something we’ve lost in terms of abundance and variety that we’ll probably never get back. Look closely at the picture. There are more giant sea bass(GSB) in this picture from one day of fishing than most divers saw during the entire decade of the 90’s. I’m also not saying all is lost BTW. We are seeing a lot of species making a comeback. Divers regularly see GSB these days even if the populations are probably not back to historic levels that existed when this photo was taken. I’m pointing out by posting this picture, however, that we’ve barely started working our way back to a place where we can say our local waters are as healthy as we want them to be. We have to keep working on it. The only way to do this is to stay involved and active. We can’t count on anyone or any entity other than ourselves. We’re all in this together and the ocean you save will be your own.

Good luck and we’ll see you out there.

It’s Election Day! Please Vote for the Love of the Ocean

Photo and awful, awful pun courtesy of someone who shall remain nameless because i told her I thought it was funny earlier today and now I deeply regret that decision.

Today is a big day in America whether you’re a red diver or a blue one. As people who care about the ocean, we have a chance and responsibility to speak  for an ocean that needs our help because it cannot speak for itself. So when you’re out there voting, think about who is going to protect the ocean and who is going to exploit it. Think about who is going to support science-based management and who is going to say “I’m no scientist but…” And finally, think about who is going to champion the ocean for the love of our world on behalf of all humanity. #allvotesmatter

Hog Island Oysters with Chipotle Horseradish Barbecue Sauce

A plate full of shell-packed goodness.
A plate full of shell-packed goodness.

I’ve spent a lot of time head down along the north coast searching for the ever delicious red abalone. Whether or not I pried one off the bottom, I still had to eat dinner. Lucky for all of us is that Nor Coast is also home to some of the the finest aquaculture products you’ll ever enjoy. So if you don’t score a few big red’s you can always enjoy some locally  raised oysters to fill the gap. Hog Island is the central place for aquaculture up north and they’ve provided us with a great way to enjoy their product.  This recipe is a perfect for an afternoon get together or even a formal fiesta. So get a grill, pop a beer, and enjoy a north coast treat.

So here is how you do it…

What you need for about 24 oysters:

  • 1 cup of your favorite tomato sauce
  • 5 tablespoons apple cider vinegar
  • 1/4 cup clover honey
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  • 1 small onion, minced
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 to 2 canned chipotle peppers in adobo finely chopped
  • 1 tbsp ground horseradish
  •  Sea salt  and freshly ground black pepper to taste
  • 24 large oysters
  • A nice loaf of bread for dipping


1. Place the first 7 ingredients in a saucepan over medium heat and bring to a simmer for about 5 to 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

2. Let the sauce cool and add in the horseradish. Salt and pepper to taste and set aside to let the flavors really meld.

3. Shuck your oysters and flip them in the bottom shell being careful not to lose the brine. it helps to put them on a flat try when your done for transport to the grill.

4. Fire up your grill to high and get ready to lay your shucked oysters.

5. Lay out your oysters with 1 tbsp of the sauce on top and cook for about 5 minutes with the lid down.

Some would say it’s a a little spicy, just like the author. I however would say I’m tall and really tasty, just like this recipe. So get to it. You can get great farmed oysters everywhere so make a batch for Memorial Day. You’ll be glad you did. Serve hot with bread and a nice white wine or IPA and make any day a special one.


Los Angeles Food Policy Council Nets Interest with Sustainable Seafood Solutions

Even blurry people like sustainable seafood

Baffled by what fish is the best choice when the weather is rainy(Like today) and you have to go to the store to get your seafood fix on because you can’t catch your own stuff? Welcome to the club as conscientious folks all over California are asking the same questions at local markets and restaurants “What to order?” Luckily for about 200 people at Loyola Marymount University last night, The Los Angeles Food Policy Council set out to answer that question.  Armed only with an array of delicious sustainable seafood samples and an equally impressively diverse array of experts to explain the what,where,why,when,and how of sustainable seafood, the LAFPC managed to educate, inform, and feed quite nicely a highly interested crowd.

As for the food, I could dazzle you right now with stories and photos of trout mousse, oysters Rockefeller, and smoked sable fish canapes but that wouldn’t be the point. What is important is that it’s foodie safe not to order the tuna, swordfish, or the chilean sea bass anymore. As Mary Sue Milliken, panelist chef of Border Grill and “Two Hot Tamales,” put it “Chef’s are creative” and making new food “sexy” is what they do. I feel in good hands.

Expert Panel
Mary Sue Milliken talking about making sustainable seafood sexy.

From the scientific management standpoint, Mark Helvey of NOAA, as well as Sheila Bowman of Seafood Watch,  made the argument that local is way to go. Tracking the sustainability of a local fishery and how the fish is brought to market is so much easier than trying to do the same thing with a shrimp brought in from Thailand. Fun, fascinating, and surprising facts that came out of the panel included that 70% of all seafood consumed is done through restaurants and that, according to Tim Aupperle of Whole Foods, consumers actually drive the buying practices of seafood retailers. That’s really good news.

I could spend a lot of time talking about how damaged and declined so many of our favorite fish choices have become but I don’t think that fear is the best way to move forward.  Instead, I think we should take a different route by asking the right questions and influencing the people providing your seafood. Letting them know that you expect more and are willing to pay for your principles is just as important. That’s called market-driven change and is part of why economics are such a huge part of any sustainability solution.

In a time when popular and longstanding seafood stocks are either in decline or at risk as we fish our way down the food chain, making the right choice is just half the battle. We need to do better. The Los Angeles Food Policy Council just made our battle a little easier.

Click here for food policy you can sink your teeth into
This is where you find out which fish is sustainable
This is who is trying to protect sustainable seafood
This is where you go to get sustainable seafood